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Scott Corley tells the Escapist how he accidentally spent six years selling games for the Palm Pilot before catching on with old friend Alex Seropian to head up Wideload's short game division.

They've got three original games in the works right now, at least one of which is an XBLA title.

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I've been playing the heck out of Freeverse's Marathon: Durandal on Xbox Live. As it's an "old school" shooter missing a lot of the technical features found in more modern games, I had always assumed that the majority of its players would be old-time Bungie fans like myself.

When I saw SniperStealth atop the single-player leaderboard with over thirty million points, I felt here must surely be an old Marathon hand who knows every twist and turn of each level without even glancing at the map.

That's not true, as it turns out. SniperStealth only had a chance to play the original briefly before diving into M:D on XBLA, but that can only be good news for Freeverse if more Bungie fans who haven't played Marathon check in to see where the roots of Halo came from.

SniperStealth was kind enough to spend a few moments to answer my questions about what drew him to this classic game.

Click "read more" from the front page for the transcript of Rampancy's interview with SniperStealth, the leading Marathon: Durandal campaign player.

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Two and a half years ago, I said that rumors that the Xbox 360 would not have a hard drive as standard were evidence that either the speculators, or someone at Microsoft, were on crack.

I thought it was silly for Microsoft to become the first company to make a hard drive standard in a console instead of an option, only to become the first company to remove the same feature.

I thought it was silly to tease developers into depending on the hard drive, and then take that away.

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Bruce "Hippieman" Morrison at Freeverse, the developer that brought Bungie's Marathon: Durandal to Xbox Live Arcade, has been working on a walkthrough of the game. While of course there is always the Marathon Spoiler Guide, which covers all three games, Marathon, Marathon 2: Durandal and Marathon: Infinity, Hippieman's walkthrough includes screenshots of environments, whereas the Spoiler Guide features only maps.

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GameSpot interviews Wideload's Scott Corley, formerly of Red Mercury and High Voltage Software, who is now heading up the Wideload Shorts department. Wideload Shorts is currently working on an Xbox Live Arcade game, said to be "nearing its final stages" with the goal of being released before the end of this year.

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Gamasutra has a five page interview with Alex "The Man" Seropian at Wideload; not too much new or substantive there, but he does confirm that Hail to the Chimp uses the Unreal engine, and that the studio has grown to 20 or so full-time and that sum is divided into two teams.

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In French, the phrase "syndrome de la page blanche", or white page syndrome, is intended as an expression of writer's block; the inability to begin a project faced with an empty page.

Myself, I always viewed it as an expression of the usefulness of limitations, boundaries, and direction: one of the reasons why so many works are derivatives and combinations is because it is easier to start with what you know and then change it than trying to tilt at the windmill of creating something truly unique. When faced with a boundary or limitation, you are teased into approaching it and testing its strength. If one was truly free to do or say truly anything without limit, it seems likely one would find nothing to say.

It is this thought that runs through my head while playing Freeverse's Xbox Live Arcade conversion of Marathon: Durandal. One is given to wonder if there is any value in such an object beyond nostalgia; a chance for those who played the game a decade ago to relive that experience. For some, a chance to recapture youth, or a chance to remember good times.

However, it is a good deal more than that; and comparing it to other games in the genre that make better use of the modern hardware in today's console provides an object lesson on the usefulness of limitations and boundaries.

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Some of us senior citizens are having a blast now that Marathon: Durandal is out for Xbox Live Arcade. I'll post later in greater length about how this adaptation is simultaneously absolutely faithful to the original while still timely and fun, and how its design teaches lessons still relevant a decade after its release.

However, many Halo fans have never played Marathon. Many may not have heard of it until now. Some, as ridiculous as this sounds, were not even born when it was released. Is Marathon still for them?

It sure is. But before playing, it's best just to do some fair warnings about some quirks in Marathon's design that might frustrate a player whose only exposure to Bungie so far is the Halo series.

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It seems that Luke Smith first dropped the one-word bomb of confirmation in the NeoGAF forums, but in case anyone had any doubts, Smith immediately followed up with an official post on Bungie.net, which was then posted about just about everywhere, including HBO,

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I have made Halo Theme song with Finale 2005, and I want to post it in
this web.I'll post mp3,mid,mus.
PS:How can me post these?

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Major Nelson says that Marathon Durandal is one of two games that will hit Xbox Live Arcade this week; specifically, on Wednesday, when XBLA gets its weekly update.

Durandal wll cost 800 points. For more information and screenshots, check the Marathon Durandal page at Xbox.com.

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Luke Smith has posted an interview with Freeverse's Bruce Morrison over at Bungie.net to explain how and why Marathon is coming to the Xbox and the role that the Bungie community played in it:

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Yes
48% (246 votes)
No
28% (142 votes)
Maybe
24% (121 votes)
Total votes: 509
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I've captured screens from many, but not all, of the individual scenes within the Halo 3 E3 2007 Campaign Trailer. Some contain things of note that have yet to be confirmed, and others show new versions of familiar objects from the Halo universe.

There appear to be three distinct kinds of scenes in the trailer. Straight gameplay footage is recognizable because HUD elements are present, and gameplay is shown either from the first person perspective if on foot, or in third person if using heavy weapons or a vehicle.

Cinematic footage, or footage of scripted events, is usually recognizable because it presents events that do not occur within the scope of gameplay and are not presented from the perspective of the player, and no HUD elements are present.

It is likely that there is a third kind of footage shown within this video: that is actual gameplay events, presented without a HUD and from an arbitrary camera position, using Halo 3's Saved Films feature. When the events shown are actual gameplay mechanics, such as infantry or vehicular combat, but the perspective is even further away from the action than when using a vehicle or heavy weapon, and no HUD elements are present, it is likely this is the kind of footage we're seeing. Rather consistently, Halo cinematics have not included significant amounts of combat, or events that could have been part of actual gameplay, with very few exceptions (the confrontation between Johnson, Keyes, and the Arbiter, for instance).

Click "read more" from the front page for the entire text, which is quite image-heavy.

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Earlier this week at E3 Lite, Microsoft and Bungie showed a video of campaign gameplay and cinematic footage from Halo 3. I've planned two pieces as a result. The first one examines the trends in the nature of campaign trailers from Halo 1 to Halo 3, and the other will break down the Halo 3 Campaign Trailer scene by scene, and will be ready later this week.

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